Partnership Board Meeting – 22 May 2018

Today (22 May) Members of Fife Health and Social Care Partnership Board discussed and supported the broad direction of the ‘Joining Up Care’ consultation proposals presented but supported an amendment to delay going to consultation for one month. A revised public facing consultation paper is to be brought to the Partnership’s next Board meeting on 21 June 2018 for approval.

The full consultation proposal is set out in 3 parts:

  • Part 1: Community and Wellbeing Hubs

Introduce more joined up ways of working between professionals to co-ordinate care and appointments, help reduce waiting times and improve the care experience through proactive intervention and working locally in communities.

  • Part 2: Re-designing Out of Hours Urgent Care

When the GP surgery is shut, these are the services that see members of the public who are looking for a GP or a nurse (advice, treatment centre care and home visits).  As well as minor injury services and the evening and night District Nursing service. It is important to state, that this is not Accident and Emergency at the hospital.

There are two options being proposed within this section. They will both have:

An Urgent Care Resource Hub

Will be an area where staff from a number of health and social care urgent services work together to coordinate service delivery. It will direct how services work in the out of hours period to make best use of resources and support so people access the right service as quickly as possible.

Urgent Care Centre(s)

This will deliver urgent care in a safe place that the public can go to. It will provide GP services, and minor injury services and can act as a base for a range of other urgent care services.

These changes are being proposed in response to the national and local challenges in regards to GP shortages, national recommendations in regards to Out of Hours and are to ensure the on-going clinical safety of patients.  The proposal does not relate to in-hours minor injuries service provision.

  • Part 3: Bringing Care Closer to Home – Community Hospital bed based care

Once people no longer need hospital care, it is better for them to get home or continue their care journey in a homely setting as quickly as possible. We know our current model could be more efficient, as some people are staying in hospital for longer than their needs require. We need to move some of our resources from hospitals to community based teams and provide care at home or in homely settings.

The collective goal of the ‘Joining Up Care’ consultation proposition is to establish a fully integrated 24 hours, 7 days a week community health and social care model that ensures sustainable, safe and more individual experience of care.

Full copies of the papers presented to go out to consultation are available on Fife Direct.

End

 

Glenrothes Councillors tour local Dementia Friendly businesses

Now in its second year, the Dementia Friendly Glenrothes initiative is going from strength to strength and Members of Glenrothes Area Committee hit the road to meet a range of businesses who are now involved.

Jubilee Grove Sheltered Housing

In just over a year, 81 businesses in Glenrothes have pledged to become Dementia Friendly.  With the support of a Dementia Friendly Project Manager, employers and their staff have been undertaking dementia friendly awareness training, adapting their workplaces and taking steps such as fitting new signage and lighting to become more inclusive.  Their actions are helping make daily living a little easier for those living with dementia and their families.

 

 

The sites visited by Councillors were:

  • Glenrothes Foodbank
  • Jubilee Grove Very Sheltered Housing
  • The Glenrothes Fire Station, and;
  •  The Rothes Halls Library

Glenrothes Fire Station

Glenrothes Food Bank

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

In Fife, there’s estimated to be over 5,000 people living with Dementia and this number is expected to double by 2030.   The idea to make Glenrothes dementia friendly originated from members of Glenrothes Area Committee and has now grown into a full scale project which is being delivered jointly by Fife Health and Social Care Partnership, the Glenrothes Area Committee, Fife Council and Alzheimer Scotland.

The aim is to support people living with dementia so they remain a valued part of their community.

One of the first businesses to take an interest was Michael Woods Centre and a year on they were presented with their official Dementia Friendly status by Cllr Jan Wincott, Vice Chair of the Glenrothes Area Committee as part of the Councillors tour.

Michael Woods Sports and Leisure Centre

On being presented with their award, Sharon Johnstone, Area Leisure Manager for Fife Sports and Leisure Trust said: “We are really pleased to receive this award.  Since getting involved in the dementia friendly initiative, staff have been fully supportive of the project aims. The trust has a well-established, successful health programme which delivers specially designed physical activity programmes for people with a range of long-term health conditions, including dementia. Ensuring Michael Woods Sports and Leisure Centre is dementia friendly and welcoming for people with dementia is a great boost for the trust’s commitment to widen access to physical activity opportunities for local communities.”

Cllr Wincott, who was joined by Councillors Altany Craik, Mick Green and Derek Noble, talks about the visit and the value the work is bringing to the local community:

“I speak on behalf of all Glenrothes Area Committee members when I say that we were all really pleased to meet just some of the businesses and organisations who have pledged their support.

The visit was a great opportunity and very thought provoking and informative.  An enormous amount of work and commitment has gone into growing this initiative from the grassroots up and we thank everyone involved.

I was particularly struck by the fact that it is often the smallest changes that can make the biggest difference.  It is not about wholesale re-fits or complicated training.   It is often about awareness, developing soft skills to make people feel comfortable and confidence to help make a difference to their customers who are in need of extra support.  The team at the Michael Woods Centre are one shining example of this work and I was delighted to present them with their Dementia Friendly status award.”

Ruth McCabe, Dementia Friendly Project Manager, commented: “Our mission is to help make daily life better for people living with dementia and their carers and change the way local people think, talk and act when it comes to dementia. By becoming a dementia friendly business staff now have the awareness and confidence to help make a difference to their customers who are in need of extra support.”

Businesses, services and community groups across Glenrothes who are interested in getting involved with the Dementia Friendly Glenrothes initiative can do so by contacting Ruth Mccabe from Alzheimer Scotland on Tel: 01592 803800 or by Email: rmccabe@alzscot.org

 

 

BSL National Plan – Consultation sessions 28 June

Deaf Communication Service would like to invite you to attend a consultation meeting about the BSL National Plan 2017-23.

The Health and Social Care Partnership are presently working on a BSL Local Plan.  Come along and find out more.  We would like to hear from you and tell us what you think of this.  We want to add what you say to the local plan

Three sessions have been booked on the same day (you do not need to come to all them)

Date:

Thursday 28th June

Where:

Town House, Wemyssfield, Kirkcaldy, KY1 1XW

Times:

10 – 12 noon

2 – 4 pm

5.30pm – 7.30pm

Interpreters have been booked for each meeting.

If you want to attend the meeting contact Deaf Communication Service by email swinfo.deafcommunications@fife.gov.uk or SMS 07984 356580

 

Partnership Board to consider ‘Joining Up Care’ consultation proposal

On the 22 May 2018, Members of Fife’s Health and Social Care Partnership Board will be asked to consider and approve a proposal for consultation on the transformation of health and social care services.

Set out in 3 parts, the ‘Joining Up Care’ consultation is in response to the:

  • growing demand for services
  • increasing complex care needs
  • publics’ desire to live well at home for longer, and;
  • national recommendations

The 3 parts are as follows:

Part 1: Community and Wellbeing Hubs

Introduce more joined up ways of working between professionals to co-ordinate care and appointments, help reduce waiting times and improve the care experience through proactive intervention and working locally in communities.

Part 2: Re-designing Out of Hours Urgent Care

When the GP surgery is shut, these are the services that see members of the public who are looking for a GP or a nurse (advice, treatment centre care and home visits).  As well as minor injury services and the evening and night District Nursing service. It is important to state, that this is not Accident and Emergency at the hospital.

There are two options being proposed within this section. They will both have:

An Urgent Care Resource Hub

Will be an area where staff from a number of health and social care urgent services work together to coordinate service delivery. It will direct how services work in the out of hours period to make best use of resources and support so people access the right service as quickly as possible.

Urgent Care Centre(s)

This will deliver urgent care in a safe place that the public can go to. It will provide GP services, and minor injury services and can act as a base for a range of other urgent care services.

These changes are being proposed in response to the national and local challenges in regards to GP shortages, national recommendations in regards to Out of Hours and are to ensure the on-going clinical safety of patients.  The proposal does not relate to in-hours minor injuries service provision.

Part 3:   Bringing Care Closer to Home – Community Hospital bed based care

Once people no longer need hospital care, it is better for them to get home or continue their care journey in a homely setting as quickly as possible. We know our current model could be more efficient, as some people are staying in hospital for longer than their needs require. We need to move some of our resources from hospitals to community based teams and provide care at home or in homely settings.

The aim is to:

  • Support people to leave hospital earlier
  • Proactively support people at home or in a homely setting so they can regain skills and confidence and stay independent for longer
  • Make sure people have access to the right type of bed at the right time, wherever they live in Fife, and;
  • Focus the use of Community Hospital beds on people with complex health conditions who need round the clock nursing care.

The proposal is to seek the public’s thoughts on the Partnership’s initial thinking where they are seeking to redefine models of care, considering where care should be in a hospital bed and where else people could best be cared for to improve their experience.

The collective goal of the ‘Joining Up Care’ proposition is to establish a fully integrated 24 hours, 7 days a week community health and social care model that ensures sustainable, safe and more individual experience of care.  If approved, the proposals will go forward for a 14 week public consultation.

Michael Kellet, Director, Fife Health and Social Care Partnership explains:

“From the youngest to the oldest, the fittest to the frailest we want people to live well in Fife. Ensuring the right care, from the right person at the right time is vital, whether this is responding to a poorly child after the GP is shut, being more proactive to support independence and wellbeing or giving complex round the clock medical care to those with long term conditions.

We know people value their local services highly, but the challenges are such that leaving services as they are is not a safe, sustainable or responsible option.  To meet modern demands, we need to adapt systems and change ways of working that have been in place for many years. We need to join care across communities and hospital services so we can continue to respond to peoples’ physical, emotional and social needs.  This includes peoples’ desire to stay independent and at home for longer.    We must also think of frontline staff and the increasing pressures they face.

“The future of Fife’s integrated care services involves all of us all.  By bringing together the review of Urgent Care Out of Hours, development of community health and wellbeing hubs and community hospital re-design under one ‘Joining Up Care’ proposal, the aim is to create a comprehensive approach to evolving services, one which will involve full consultation with the public before any change is made.  We await the decision by Members on the 22 May.”

Full copies of the ‘Joining Up Care’ Consultation proposal papers are now available on Fife Direct.    A draft ‘Joining Up Care’ Consultation Summary document is included and you can find that here.

 

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Walk a Mile Event – 15 June 2018

Fife Health and Social Care Partnership in conjunction with See Me are holding a Walk a Mile event at 2pm on Friday June 15th 2018  in Silverburn Park and Stratheden Hospital grounds.

Walk a Mile 2017

Walk a Mile brings people together to speak about mental health and ‘walk a mile in each other’s shoes’. There are no uniforms, no barriers and everyone is on a level playing field; it’s about breaking down stigma and seeing how fabulous people are.

If anyone wants to join us to walk and talk they can register by signing up for a free ticket online (no need to print the ticket) at Eventbrite at www.bit.ly/2w7Kwn3

 

 

Positive Talks – Marie Curie and Fife Partnership Workshop

Representatives from Fife Health and Social Care Partnership (FH&SCP) and Marie Curie have met to discuss the future design of Marie Curie Nursing Service in Fife. The joint workshop was the next step in developing and shaping what the service could look like, as Claire Dobson, Divisional General Manager (West) at the Fife Health and Social Care Partnership explains:

“The day was really positive and discussions reflected the enthusiasm to work together.  With everyone working together the aim is to ensure people in Fife are able to access high quality palliative and end of life care whilst ensuring any service we develop is sustainable and fit for the future. Both agencies face increasing demand and we must be able to adapt to need, particularly as more people will need this type of care in the future. I am hopeful that through these constructive discussions a detailed agreement can be reached.”

Caroline Paterson, Marie Curie Regional Nursing Manager for North Scotland agreed: “I was pleased with the discussions and it was clear that everyone around the table is passionate about getting this right for terminally ill people in Fife. We now look forward to working with the Partnership to fine tune the design of the Marie Curie Nursing Service so it is able to work for everyone. More people are going to need this type of care in the future so it must be a sustainable and flexible service. Funding for Marie Curie services are supported by public donations and I’d urge Fife residents to continue to donate to support terminally ill people.

 

 

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Work with patients proving to be best medicine

Fife Health and Social Care Partnership Board Members have heard how work with patients is helping to improve wellbeing through management of medicines.

Fiona Allan, Senior Clinical Pharmacist in Polypharmacy, gave a presentation which outlined the work that NHS Fife and Fife Health and Social Care Partnership are wanting to replicate across the Kingdom as part of the approach to get the best for patients and their medicines.

 

 

Fiona stated:  “Polypharmacy just means ‘lots of medicines’. We know that the more medicines patients have to take on a daily basis, the more they are at risk of possible side effects. This is particularly true for frail elderly patients.  My role involves meeting with patients, generally over the age of 65, on more than 5 regular medicines (often more than ten), to check how they are managing with their medicines. 

 

We work together to ensure there is a clear need for every tablet they are on, that all their medicines are working well, that there are no side effects or problems and, most importantly, that the patient is willing and able to manage their overall list of pills. My patients have described it as their ‘medicines MOT’.  This is not about stopping medicines. It is about getting the best possible combination of medicines for you.”

 

Fiona told the story of one patient, who she worked with over a period of 2 months to optimise her medicines.  Linda from Kirkcaldy, was initially on 11 meds and through working with Fiona this reduced to six.  By working together, they succeeded in reducing her risk of falling and stomach problems and most importantly Linda said she felt better and had an improved quality of life. 

 

Fiona added: “Pharmacists are ideally placed to help with this type of review and it would be great to roll this service out further to more patients.  Making a difference to patients is what it is all about.”